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Blockchain Mysteries: Biggest Crypto Transaction fee Oddities

Users can send cryptocurrencies virtually anywhere globally via the blockchains on which they are based. By sending crypto assets, however, fees are incurred. Transactions may take longer for certain assets, depending on their related blockchains. Certain crypto wallets and platforms give users the option to choose a transaction fee. Higher fees typically result in faster transactions. Over the years, however, some asset holders have put their coin or token values into the wrong fields, resulting in exorbitant, albeit accidental, fee payments. For example, a holder might intend to send 12 Bitcoin (BTC) at a fee of 0.01 BTC, although they might accidentally put 12 BTC into the fee box, spending 12 BTC on fees while sending just 0.01 BTC to the intended destination. A number of fee mishaps have occurred involving Ether (ETH) and Bitcoin. Here are a few painful fee stories

In February 2019, one industry participant mistakenly paid a grand sum of 2,730 ETH for fees as part of three Ethereum-based transactions. The sender paid fees of 420, 210 and 2,100 ETH in the triad of transactions. According to ETH prices at the time of reporting in March 2019, the transaction costs totaled approximately $365,800.Fortunately, this sender received an act of good will from SparkPool, the mining pool on the other end of the transaction. “Thank you SparkPool and your miners for helping us to recover our loss,” the accidental ETH transactor noted as part of a blockchain message. “We are willing to share half of 2100 ETH with the miners to thanks the miners’ integrity,”the transactor added.Ether is now valued at $1,850 per coin at the time of publication, making this event worth just over $5 million in total.

In the summer of 2020, three Ethereum transactions surfaced, incurring more than $5 million worth of total combined fees, based on ETH prices at the time. Someone sent 0.55 ETH, valued near $134 total back then, in a transaction on June 10, 2020, spending a whopping $2.6 million worth of ETH on gas, an industry term for the funds paid for transactions on Ethereum’s network. Following the multi-million-dollar fee event, two more hefty transactions surfaced. One saw another $2.6 million paid to send 350 ETH. The other transferred 3,221 ETH, tallying close to the same amount for gas 2,310 ETH to be exact. All three moves occurred between June 10 and 11, 2020.

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